Saturday, July 17, 2010

A Few Years Just Before Republicans Ruled, There Was King Tut

Zani Hawass. Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the pharaohs. Washington, D.C.: National Georgraphic. (2005)

This excellent photographic collection of Tutankhamu’s artifacts also yields information for history readers. The knowledge of such information that the Egyptian pharaohs learned to create peace treaties and use intermarriage with rival to tranquil relations presents examples of leadership from that era.

Nearly all of Egypt was ruled by one King, or Pharoah, around 3050 BC. Egypt had two distinct societies, each with their own religion. One society lived in the Nile Valley, known as Upper Egypt. The other society was in the Delta region, known as Lower Egypt. Over time, political power shifted from the central government of the king towards provincial leaders. Drought and famine may have spurred this power shift. This power shifted back to the king circa 1975 to 1640 BC. Invaders believed to be Asiatic, called Hykos, conquered part of Egypt. Kerma conquered Lower Nabia from Egypt.

Kamosis ruled as Egypt retook much of both lost lands from the Hykos and the Ker. Ahmosis ruled as the Hykos were finally defeated. Egypt expanded its boundaries to protect itself from future invaders. Prisoners were seized to fight in the Egyptian army.

The ruoe of Amenhoteol found much wealth from mines and quarries in the conquered Nubian lands. The next ruler,.Tuthmosis, won a final victory against Kerma, further extending Egypt’s borders southwards. Tuthmosis I then invaded into Syria.

Hatshepsut ruled as Regent under the title of God’s Wife of Amun and then claimed to be King, a position prior reserved only to males. She claimed an oracle from Amun gave her the power. King Tuthmosis III later became king and had Hatshepsut removed from all historic records. Tuthmosis III seized many goods from the Mitanni, a Syro-Palestinian coalition. His son Amenhotep II reached peace with the Mitann, making Amenhotep II the last of the warring leaders. His son Tuthmosis VI married the daughter of a former war enemy to bring peace between the two cultures. His son, Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti banished the worship of the existing religions and created a state religion with just one deity, Aten. This was received with much public dissent.

Tutankhamun became ruler by birth rite circa 1332 BC when Akenaten died. Tutankhamun was about 8 or 9 years old. Tutankhamun allowed the reestablishment of the banned religions. He died after ruling less than ten years. The cause of death is lost to history Leaving no heir, an advisor Aye took control. Aye also left no heir. There was an attempt to erase Tutankhamun’s rule from history. Ironically, the removal of his name from records also allowed his tomb to be untouched by the grave robbers of history. His tomb was discovered in 1922 in an expedition led by Howard Carter.

The photographs in the book are a superb record of what was found in the tomb. This is an excellent book for anyone wishing to see and read about “King Tut”.

5 Comments:

Blogger 香昱信張君林 said...

i consder your artical is so nice!............................................................

5:19 PM  
Blogger 家榮家榮 said...

絕不要羞於承認自己不知道的事。..................................................

2:02 AM  
Blogger 琬安琬安 said...

Necessity is the mother of invention..................................................................

12:26 AM  
Blogger WillianT_Smotherman0恆迪 said...

絕不要羞於承認自己不知道的事。..................................................

9:25 PM  
Blogger Tchaikovsky Sounds Funny said...

Glad you like the artical, whatever that is. Maybe an artical got together with a woman and gave birth to necessity?

11:08 AM  

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